Vandalism and Xenophobic

To my mind, vandals and xenophobia are twin that have no place in this modern age. Often in times, the reaction is seriously flawed with baseless reasons.

People in this category believed all life challenges can only be solved using one tactic – violence.

Only last week, I was walking through my town early in the morning, around my old neighbourhood at Akarabata Street so spotted my little sister’s old primary school.

For the first time I noticed that LA Primary School Alapata was burnt during the last

LA Primary School Alapata, Modakeke

LA Primary School Alapata, Modakeke

crisis of Ife and Modakeke – the memory came back fresh. Really? They got here? – it has been 18 years, yet the building remained a shell.

Why do people destroy properties? For what purpose especially in our case that there is a likelihood that the structure will never be refurbished.

How do we change people’s mentality not to destroy public properties and businesses during disagreement?

LA Primary School Alapata

LA Primary School Alapata

I only remember this today when reading online comments about South Africa xenophobic attitude towards Nigerians and other African foreigners in the region.

MTN Nigeria Corporate Services Executive in his remarks urge Nigerians not to attack MTN offices in Nigeria as the first people to suffer will obviously be Nigerians. Mr Wale Goodluck made this remarks because of threats Nigerians have made to destroy their offices given it was a South African company.

What is it with us and wastefulness? So Nigerians are being attacked in SA, we must destroy SA business in Nigeria? How does that solve the problem of people losing their homes, businesses and lives in SA?

Sadly, this is the order of the day, someone says something one disagrees with, the next thing is destroy their property?

Maybe another point to add to Buharis’ long to-do list is that vandals of any kind to be illegal and punishable by law. Enough of eye for an eye.



Categories: A Yoruba Monarch, Africa, Nigeria

Tags: , , ,

14 replies

  1. Nigerians NEVER attack foreigners, we are mostly too busy dealing with each other & sorting out our 200+ ethnic differences to bother about a ‘few’ other folks from across Africa. LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi FK
    Nice piece.
    You cleverly pointed out that the problem is not solely a South African problem but one that is common to nearly all African countries (Nigeria included). This is why I will not get on my ‘high horse’ and condemn black South Africans, needless to say their behavior is shameful, and reflective of attitudes that seem to have remained with black people.
    The same thing occurs in Nigeria, a successful group (even unsuccessful groups) will be targeted and attacked, due to jealousy, insecurity, mob rule, operating under the umbrella of poor leadership. People should remember that during Buhari’s last spell in power many millions of ECOWAS citizens were forcibly evicted from Nigeria (the reasons given were due to them taking jobs and taking part in crime – sounds familiar doesn’t it), even though many of them had valid papers. During the expulsion many were robbed by Nigerians. It doesn’t end there, even within Nigeria as you have pointed out many disputes between locals results in division and the next thing we know violence for example the LA primary school in Alapata.
    As you have rightly pointed out Nigerians running out into the streets to attack South African business, doesn’t help the situation. It is a shame that black South Africans with all the suffering they have experienced seem not to have learned a lesson of basic humanity. They will have to search their consciousness for that.
    Solution comes from the grass roots, parents and society should not condone or encourage violence as solution to disagreements. Political leaders should not encourage tacit approval of mob rule to carry out pogroms or attacking segments of society because they are successful, or any other reason for difference. A better solution for those who are jealous is to realise that it is possible to make a success out of your situation. If others can do it, surely you can do it too, it is a matter of how and application. For those who have differences to talk and arrive at an agreement. This is basic common sense that seems to elude Africans.
    I’d also like to point out that in the case of South Africa, signs were put up about “Africans should not attack fellow Africans” or words to that effect. The bigger picture is that no one deserves to be attacked, regardless of their background be it African or otherwise. Those who are poor are not entitled to use violence to take goods from others that do not belong to them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Spot on re using the grassroots to educate and to discourage violence as the only way out. Looking at the what is going on in SA, it is the ‘grassroots’ poisoning the idle minds, this mirrors exactly what we are dealing with in Nigeria. Here:

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3049526/A-palace-six-wives-155-000-military-uniforms-28-children-Jaw-dropping-life-Zulu-King-blamed-sparking-South-African-bloodshed-branding-immigrants-lice.html

      The influence of grassroots to local community can not be overstated as people do listen to their elders and believed they knew all, whereas many of these ‘leaders’ refused to leave behind their dark ages mentality of born into privilege, so in this modern age, they blame all hard working normal people for every little thing they can’t have.

      In Britain, they have only one Queen. In Nigeria, I alone have at least 3 kings within 15 miles radius I ‘must’ bow for – insane world, and in turn they all claim allowances on my head from the government and if not given they cause trouble. The last year alone, more than 30 kings have been created just for this purpose alone.

      What a world, we are our own major headache.

      And You see those who put the equally xenophobic signs up of African to not attack fellow Africans are birds of the same feathers… same people will be quick to condemn their family being attacked in the West.

      Like

      • Ah FK, I breathe a big sigh of disappointment.
        As you have pointed out the privileged be it political, cultural or religious are abusing the system and failing in their responsibilities to ‘deliver’ to the people. They pin their shortcomings on everyone else but themselves. The idea of entitlement should be surely curtailed, King Zwelethini can not claim for 6 wives and 28 kids, typical African!!! This rampant abuse will is leading South Africa to lose it’s stride, it is falling behind the other BRICS nations. As you said, we have similar abuses in Nigeria, they may not be as lavishly supported by the government, but we have too many of them. There are too many Obas, Ezes, Chiefs, Queens, Princesses, Malams, Emirs. Not to mention their large families and hangers-on. This has to be brought to an end, the problem is that they will send their thugs to silence anyone who voices such an opinion, so tax payers are cowed into silence and they can continue to live the highlife amidst their impoverished subjects. If there is a problem it is deflected onto some unfortunate group that don’t meet with their approval, and hence the mob are encouraged to “do what they will” with the target group.

        You are right, these “African solidarity..” is just talk, they are the same ones who will shout “racism”, when any family member is attacked or discriminated in the West. There are many South Africans both black and white in Britain and Australia (especially Perth and Sydney), who enjoy peaceful and safe existence outside the shores of South Africa, the least South Africa can do is reciprocate.

        With this violence going on, one can’t get too ‘worked up’ about the fact that the illegal migrants to Europe practice racism amongst themselves. The darker you are, the further down in the ship you go (where it is more dangerous) and you get locked in the hold and get no food or water. Should any disaster occur those who are least likely to survive are the darkest ones. Yet Africans are busy killing one another, due to political manipulation and jealousy by their worthless leaders.

        We have a big problem.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. It is barbaric behavior that can be curbed through education. If he achieves nothing else, Buhari should strengthen the education system across Nigeria and enforce policies — similar to those in developed countries — where everyone must have at least a primary education.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Man is intrinsically a VERY VIOLENT ANIMAL because life was scientifically formed by Negative Combination ! Do not forget that BUHARI and Hitler have demonstrated the worst part of this Violent life attributes sometime in History. Indiscipline can Never bring Discipline no Matter how you paint it!!! I don’t blame you for your suggestion .You are only being Human. BUT WE CAN ONLY WIN BY THE GREAT SPIRIT OF MADIBA AND JESUS THE CHRIST!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • True that lots of time there are violence led by the leaders and citizens just have to ride along – That was Buhari in the early 80s – time will tell if he is a changed man now or not.
      Here I was talking about citizens on citizen violence where destroying properties and businesses are used to vent grievances – that never achieved anything but compound the misery for ordinary people in the end.
      Agree that Africa can do a lot better by adopting the spirit of Madiba.
      With Jesus Christ, that’s important for the Christians, many people have other spiritual leaders they worship hence it is important that Nigeria have a law outside of religion that allow us to live in peace with one another.

      Like

  5. Exactly! Two wrongs wouldn’t make one right. Violence for violence is definitely NOT the answer. I find it sad to think Africans are committing such atrocities against fellow Africans?! I do hope that the SA and Nigerian authorities find away ro calm down the flames soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hope so too.

      Only a few months ago, both nations were supposedly the biggest economy in Africa, you would think that would be enough incentive to help one another? They have more FDI, we have plenty of people that wanted to work…and now this?

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I hear you. It’s the same with riots. You rarely have a decent peaceful protest, without it degenerating into a riot that leads to vandalization. it makes you wonder what is going on in the head of the vandals as they burn and tear down things.

    Liked by 1 person

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